Are Eggs Healthy? Get the Facts


Are eggs good for you or an artery clogger? Eggs often get a bad reputation due to their cholesterol content. In fact, they are packed with vitamins and other important nutrients. We’ve taken a closer look at the magical hen’s egg and broke down our findings for you. 

The oval of power – and that’s no yoke

Eggs are packed with nutrients. The bioavailability of all the egg’s nutrients is off the charts. For instance, the egg has all essential amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein and especially important for athletes. There’s more: eggs contain all the major vitamins (with the exception of vitamin C), such as vitamin A, D, E, and the B vitamins. This powerful hen fruit also has the trace elements zinc, iron, and selenium – not to mention antioxidants. And don’t worry about the calories; a medium sized egg only has about 90 calories. 

Did you know?

Most of the nutrients are in the egg yolk, not the white.

Fried eggs

Facts about Eggs 

  • Depending on the size, one egg contains around 80-100 cal
  • It’s ⅓ protein and ⅔ fat
  • Eggs contain vitamins, micronutrients and antioxidants
  • All essential amino acids are inside every egg
  • Egg yolks contain more protein than egg whites
  • An egg has 237 mg of cholesterol 
  • Buy organic eggs from local free-range sources

Are Eggs High in Cholesterol? 

One large egg contains about 237 mg of cholesterol.(1) The ideal blood cholesterol level is below 200 mg/dl.(2) Eggs were considered unhealthy for a long time, mainly due to the high cholesterol content and the risk associated with heart disease.

Recent studies have been looking at the connection between egg consumption, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.(3,4) This research showed neither a negative nor a positive influence on the aforementioned diseases. 

Because of this, there is no recommendation for the amount of eggs in your diet. What matters is that your diet is balanced. Eggs definitely deserve a spot in a healthy diet, since they provide valuable nutrients. It’s also important to consume more plant-based fats (nuts, seeds, avocados, and plant-based oils) than animal fats. 

If you have type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease, you need to keep an eye on your egg consumption. Talk to your doctor about it. 

Did you know?

It’s possible that you discover that your cholesterol level is high during a routine blood test even though you eat no or almost no animal fats. This may be genetic and can’t be changed much through diet. Talk to your doctor about how to treat it.

Eggs and Muscle Growth 

One large egg has 10g of protein AND a complete amino acid profile. That means it has all the essential amino acids. Your body cannot produce these, so you need to get them through your food, and they play a vital role in building muscle. 

There are 20 amino acids present in the human body. They are broken down into essential, semi-essential, and non-essential amino acids

Essential Semi-Essential Non-Essential
Valine Cysteine Alanine
Isoleucine Glutamine Aspartic acid
Histidine Proline Glutamic acid
Lysine Tyrosine Serine
Methionine Glycine
Tryptophan Taurine
Phenylalanine
Threonine

If you eat eggs 30 minutes before a workout, they support muscle growth and regeneration of muscle tissue. Remember to combine protein with carbohydrates after your workout (ratio 1:3) to refuel your muscles. Add two slices of whole grain bread to your scrambled eggs and vegetables, for example. 

What do you say? Are you ready for some eggs? We’ve got three tasty recipes for you that are perfect after a tough workout.

Post-Workout Snack: 3 Egg Recipes

1. Shakshuka with Feta

Shakshuka with feta cheese

Ingredients for 2 servings:

  • 400 g diced tomatoes
  • 1 bell pepper
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 onion
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1 Tbsp Italian seasoning
  • 100 g feta
  • 4 eggs
  • Salt (to taste)
  • 1 Tbsp parsley (chopped)

Directions:

  1. Dice the onion and bell pepper.
  2. Heat the oil in a pan and sauté the onion. Then add the bell pepper and sauté for 5 minutes.
  3. Add the chili powder, salt, and seasoning.
  4. Next, add the diced tomatoes. Let the vegetables simmer for another 5 minutes.
  5. Crumble the feta and mix it into the vegetables.
  6. Using a spoon, create three small wells for the eggs and crack the eggs into them.
  7. Reduce the heat and cover the pan with a lid. The eggs take 3-5 minutes to cook.
  8. Sprinkle the shakshuka with parsley. Serve with a slice of crusty bread.

2. Stuffed Sweet Potato Skins

Sweet potato skins

Ingredients for 1 serving:

  • 1 sweet potato
  • 2 eggs
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Crushed red pepper flakes to taste

Directions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 200°C (400°F). 
  2. Place the sweet potato on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake it for approx. 45 minutes until it is soft.
  3. Then cut the potato in half and scoop out most of the flesh, leaving a 5 mm layer of potato. But don’t throw the tasty flesh away – you can use it as an extra side dish or turn it into mashed sweet potatoes.
  4. Carefully crack an egg into each sweet potato half and bake your skins for an additional 15-20 minutes. 
  5. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, and some crushed red pepper flakes.

Spinach Potato Frittata 

Bundle of fresh spinach

Ingredients for 2 servings:

  • 200 g potatoes 
  • Handful of baby spinach 
  • 1 red onion
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 4 eggs
  • 4 Tbsp (plant-based) milk 
  • 3 Tbsp plant-based oil
  • 50 g feta
  • Chopped parsley 
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Directions:

  1. Wash the potatoes well, peel and chop into small pieces. Wash the spinach.
  2. Finely dice the onion and chop the garlic.
  3. Beat the eggs and milk in a bowl with a whisk. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. Preheat the oven to 200°C upper and lower heat.  
  5. Heat 2 Tbsp of plant-based oil in an oven-safe pan and fry the potatoes for a few minutes at a high temperature. Season with salt and remove them from the pan. 
  6. Heat the remaining 1 Tbsp of plant-based oil in the pan and sauté the onion and garlic. Toss in the spinach and cook just until it begins to wilt. Stir in the potatoes. 
  7. Pour the egg-milk mixture evenly over the vegetables and let it cook for about 4 minutes at a low temperature until the edges begin to pull away from the pan.
  8. Place the pan in the oven and bake for about 15 minutes. 
  9. Sprinkle feta over the frittata just before you take it out of the oven. 
  10. Add a garnish of chopped parsley before serving.

Summary: Are eggs healthy?

There is room for eggs in a healthy balanced diet. They provide essential amino acids and numerous vitamins, trace elements, and antioxidants, which makes them especially valuable for athletes. However, if you’re concerned about heart disease or type 2 diabetes, don’t overdo it – always keep an eye on your consumption of animal fat and cholesterol. 

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